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All about Prague

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Welcome to a world of magic and alchemy: featuring four lesser-known Prague attractions and a spa to pamper you in the winter.

  • 1. Lázně na lodi

    Lázně na Lodi

    Lázně na Lodi at Rašínovo nábřeží


    Lázně na lodi is a wellness center with sauna and spa. It is located on the river at Rašínovo nábřeží and offers jaw-dropping views of the city. Guests can enjoy a classic Finnish sauna and bathe in a hot water outdoor pool. The a pilot project by H3T architekti, aims to test the interest of Prague residents and visitors in sauna facilities. So far, the project is a success.
  • 2. Muzeum Smyslů

    Muzeum Smyslů, the Museum of Senses, is a playful tourist attraction, which only opened in November 2017. It is a unique experience, fun and educational at the same time. You start with a walk through a dark tunnel where the water flows upwards, and the journey will take you to the top of a skyscraper, to a dessert of optical illusions, in a park where you can play music and form extraordinary sand structures, and so on. Simply fascinating, and a great stop for a fun winter afternoon in Prague.

    Muzeum Smyslů

    Muzeum Smyslů: Infinity disco room

  • 3. Mysteria Pragensia

    The Museum of Alchemists and Magicians “Mysteria Pragensia” is a sensational attraction that offers a trip into the occult with odd exhibits that challenge your imagination and beliefs. They also have a pub and often offer ghost tours of Old Prague, as well as boat tours on the Vlatva.

    Mysteria Pragensia

    Museum of Alchemists and Magicians

  • 4. Reon Argondian’s Magical Cavern

    Reon Argondian’s Magical Cavern on Petřín Hill is an art project the artist started in 2005. It’s a private cave-like museum with walls covered with the psychedelic paintings of Argondian (nee Jan Zahradnik). This is also the artist’s studio, where you can meet him and see him at work.

    Magical Cavern

    Reon Argondian inside his Magical Cavern

  • 5. Speculum Alchemiae

    We remain in the world of magic with our last stop: Speculum Alchemiae. It is a relatively new attraction, discovered after the floods that affected the historical center of Prague in 2002. This was the secret laboratory of the alchemists of the rennaissance and the current exhibition gives an authentic view of the city’s occult past, featuring items that belonged to personalities like John Dee, Tadeáš Hájek of Hájek, Rabbi Löw, and Tycho Brahe among many others.

    Speculum Alchemiae

If you have more than a weekend in Prague, you could also visit Matej Kren’s “Idiom” installation at Mariánské nám. 98/1, in the entrance hall of the Prague Municipal Library. The artist’s “tower of books” was installed here in 1998 and still fascinates the visitors of the library. Made of 8,000 books, the tower has also been sometimes dubbed the “Column of Knowledge.”

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Holešovice

Holešovice has emerged in the past ten years as Prague’s capital of cool. It boasts fancy industrial spaces housing bars, clubs, and all kinds of artsy shops showcasing up and coming Czech designers and artists. Some of its abandoned factories and slaughterhouses are now used for pop-up cultural events, exhibitions (like DOX Center for Contemporary Art), or are centers for performing arts.

Some of the coolest places to see in Holešovice include the neo-Gothic Church of St. Anthony of Padua, the Veletržní palác, and the Praha-Holešovice railway station. But besides architectural landmarks, this neighborhood offers enough to entertain you.

The Národní galerie v Praze, National Gallery in Prague, is housed in large part inside the Veletržní palác. One the largest museums in Central Europe, the gallery has an extensive permanent collection featuring works by artists such as Picasso, Van Gogh, Cézanne, Miró, Klimt, Gauguin, and many others. Czech and Slovak painters and sculptors are also represented through the works of Alfons Mucha, František Kupka, Rudolf Fila, and Bohumil Kubišta, among many others.

Výstaviště Praha is another interesting destination in Holešovice. These are Prague’s Exhibition Grounds, a popular attraction since opening in 1891. They are located next to the Stromovka Park.

Or, you can hang out with the hipsters at VNITROBLOCK. It is a multifunctional concept store with original brands, sustainable fashion, and interior design by European designers, as well as live DJs, art exhibitions, DIY workshops, and other cultural events. One side of the space is occupied by trendy café.

If nature is your thing, there are two beautiful parks in Holešovice: Letna, with views of the Old Town, and Stromovka, the largest park in Prague.

Last, but not least, Holešovice is a great destination if you love street art. Almost all its streets will reveal a gem of proportions, but the best art is still on Milady Horakove street.

Holešovická Tržnice, now Pražská tržnice, or the Prague Market, is another appealing attraction. It’s a maze of stalls selling all kinds of goods. You’ll even find a “Mint Market,” a pop-up design market selling original fashion, jewelry, and accessories, plus concerts and workshops.

Do you have any other favorite spots in Holešovice you would like to mention?

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Naplavka

When in Prague, don’t follow the tourist crowds. The city has a lot to offer if you want to explore it like a local. You will find many surprising spots to hang out if you get off the beaten path. One of them, Naplavka, also known as “Prague’s hipster hangout,” is a stretch of pavement along the River Vltava.

It all started with Bajkazyl, a bike shop and bar founded in 2010 by Martin Kontra. When people discovered it, they found the neighborhood irresistible, and soon, other venues popped up. Today, Naplavka stretches from Palackého most to the railway bridge at Vyton. It is a lively spot with buzzy sidewalk cafes and restaurants serving good food and drinks al fresco.

The locals usually come here to spend a couple of hours at a terrace, but other activities may include roller skating, cycling, or attending a cultural event. Evenings are full of laughter, with many live concerts taking place in summer months. The Rašínovo nábřeží embankment in Naplavka is the perfect spot for beautiful panoramic views of the Hradčany Castle too.

On the official website of the Naplavka neighborhood, you can find a map of the boardwalks, practical information, and a list of events. Among the latest, the farmers’ market is a must see. It takes place every Saturday, from 8:00 am till 2:00 pm. Besides fresh flowers, fruit, and vegetables, at this market, you will also find original culinary creations, including cakes, pies, strudels, cookies, fresh juices, ice cream, chocolate, coffee, tea, beer, wine and handmade toys and jewellery. You can also drop in for ready meals at breakfast or lunch. The market is also the occasional site for thematic events like beer and wine festivals, live concerts, and more.

Last, but not least, Naplavka is where you will find four Busking sites. Busking is a musical, theatrical or artistic production run in public places with the purpose of obtaining a cash contribution from passersby. You can find more information here.

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David Černý's Kafka

One of the most delightful ways of discovering Prague is walking in Kafka’s footsteps. More than a walking tour, this is a cultural experience. You can start at Náměstí Franze Kafky where his birth house stood once. Only a door is left from the building where Prague’s beloved novelist and short story writer saw the light of day. You can still see it integrated as the main door of the building standing at Náměstí Franze Kafky 3, next to the Church of St Nicholas.

Kafka spent his childhood (from 1889 till 1896) in the beautiful Dům U Minuty (Staroměstské nám. 3/2 – in the Old Town Square), in English, House at the Minute – a stunning Gothic-style building covered in ornate Sgraffito decorations depicting scenes from Greek mythology, Renaissance, and the Bible.

Dům U Minuty

Have a cup of coffee at Café Franz Kafka before you begin your walk to the Old-New Synagogue (Altneuschul), which is not only the place where Kafka attended religious services, but also Europe’s oldest active synagogue. An edifice dating from 1270, the synagogue was among the first Gothic buildings erected in Prague, and today it remains the oldest surviving medieval synagogue of twin-nave design in existence. The synagogue is open to the public, but they charge an admission fee, so have cash ready.

From here, walk to 16 Dlouhá, where you will find the house where Kafka wrote the bulk of his novel The Trial in 1915. From here, you can walk to Café Louvre (Národní 22), one of the few remaining of Kafka’s favorite haunts. Kafka was not the only famous patron of this monument: Karel Capek and Albert Einstein count among the cherished guests of the locale too. The venue also boasts a non-smoking saloon and restaurant, patisserie, billiards, and in the summer months terrace, plus a gallery with a nice café and a Functionalist style saloon, suitable for exhibitions and other events.

Another Kafka favorite, Palác Lucerna (at Štěpánská 61) still offers a rich cultural program, along with cafes, restaurants, and shops. From here, the Kafka Museum (at Cihelná 635/2b) is 25 minutes on foot.

Kafka is also celebrated in street art, as well as through an impressive monument by David Černý.

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Fall Prague

The UK Post Office Travel Money ranked Prague among the top budget-friendly destinations for UK travelers in 2017. The Czech capital follows European destinations like Algarve (Portugal), Sunny Beach (Bulgaria), Costa del Sol (Spain), and Marmaris (Turkey). The top continues with Paphos (Cyprus), Budapest (Hungary), Sliema (Malta), Corfu (Greece), Porec (Croatia), Sorrento (Italy), and Nice (France). Tokyo (Japan), Cancun (Mexico), and Cape Town (South Africa) are also considered to be among the most affordable destinations for UK vacationers according to the Holiday Money Report 2017.

Top Cheap Destinations 2017

The UK Post Office Travel Money monitors the price of eight tourist items – comprising dinner for two with wine, a range of drinks, suncream and insect repellent to generate its Holiday Money Report. Out of 44 resorts and cities around the world, the report has found that Europe takes 9 of the top 10 places – with Tokyo at number 8 before Sliema and Corfu.

Prague and Budapest offer excellent value accommodation and dining opportunities, as well as quality entertainment year-round. For visitors interested in luxury without paying an arm and a leg, Mamaison offers a good choice of accommodation and dining at the two destinations: Mamaison Hotel Riverside, Mamaison Residence Belgicka, and Mamaison Residence Downtown in Prague, and, in Budapest, Mamaison Hotel Andrassy and Mamaison Residence Izabella. Booking directly on our corporate website guarantees guests the best online prices and a variety of other perks.

Our hotels and residences are centrally located and close to some of the most interesting and attractive tourist and cultural landmarks of the two cities. You can choose Mamaison hotels for accommodation when you travel on business too, as well are equipped to satisfy your needs, offering free WiFi and business amenities. You have dining choices at your Mamaison hotels, or you can explore their neighborhoods to find something for your budget too.

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Fall Prague

Our guests staying at Mamaison Hotel Riverside, Mamaison Residence Belgicka, or Mamaison Residence Downtown enjoy a wealth of attractions within short distance from their hotels. These are some of the things we recommend for first time-visitors.

There’s no charge to enter the grounds of the Prague Castle, but a ticket grants you entrance to the St Vitus’s Cathedral, the Castle museum, the Basilica of St George, the Golden Lane and the Daliborka Tower.

Mamaison Hotel Riverside Prague

Then don’t miss the Old Town Square (Staromestske namesti) and its architectural gems: Church of Our Lady, the Old Town Hall Tower & Astronomical Clock, and the St. Nicholas Church.

Close up of the Prague astronomical clock

Of course, Charles Bridge (Karluv Most) is a must. It is the oldest Prague bridge built in the place of a former Judith Bridge which had been badly damaged by a flood in 1342. The Stone Bridge or Prague Bridge (as it was originally called) was founded by Emperor Charles IV in 1357 and acquired the name Charles Bridge in 1870.

A must see, the Jewish Quarter (Josefov) is surrounded by the Old Town. It is believed that the quarter has its origins in the 10th century, when the first Jews came here. Here you’ll find one of Prague’s best known landmarks, the Old Jewish Cemetery. The most notable personalities buried in the Old Jewish Cemetery are Yehuda ben Bezalel known as the Maharal Rabbi Löw (d. 1609), Mordechai Maisel (d. 1601), David Gans (d. 1613) and David Oppenheim(d. 1736).

The Strahov Monastery and Library (Strahovský kláster) is a temple for tradition and culture. Visitors are encouraged to visit the libraries, which boast over 125,000 volumes – one of the world’s most profound collections of theological texts – and stunning interiors.

In the early 1980s the young citizens of Prague started painting and writing on an otherwise plain wall, covering it up with portraits of John Lennon and The Beatles, and lines from their songs. The Lennon Wall was a constant aggravation for the communist regime of the time. Today it is a symbol of love and peace.

lennon wall

The world-renowned statue of Infant Jesus of Prague (Pražské Jezulátko) can be seen inside the Church of Our Lady Victorious in Malá Strana. The wax statue was brought into Bohemia in 1628 by princess Polyxena von Lobkowitz, who later donated it to the Discalced Carmelites in Prague.

If you’re seeking a place to take a quiet break, look no further than Letna Park. This city oasis is known for attracting locals and tourists alike, especially during hot, summer days.

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David Černý's Kafka

David Černý is a prominent figure in the Czech Republic. A son of Prague, the sculptor has already made a strong mark in the city, and his works represent true landmarks, famous tourist attractions. If you want an alternative to traditional Prague tours, follow the “Černý-path” – and start with his newest addition to the local art scene, the amazing mechanical sculpture known as Kafka at Wenceslas Square. This stunning kinetic sculpture measures 10 m in height, and is entirely made of steel. HepcoMotions Heavy Duty Rings technology enables 42 independently driven layers to move, creating stunning effects.

Just off Wenceslaw Square, at Lucerna Pasaz, you will find another work by Černý, this time an upside-down horse, and St Vitus riding it. It’s a puzzling creation, controversial and often photographed by tourists. Get your camera ready: the journey continues.

Horse

Cross the Charles Bridge, and visit the Franz Kafka museum – “Piss” by David Černý seems to be the main attraction here. The sculpture, which depicts two men peeing into a Czech Republic-shaped fountain, is interactive – you can use your mobile phone to send an SMS and control how the two figures pee.

Piss

Talking about bizarre creations, the Zizkov TV Tower is now known for its grotesque “tower babies,” which are also a vision by Černý. Initially, the babies were supposed to make the tower more attractive. It may not be attractive, but its certainly famous. Controversial art has its effects on people.

tower babies

As you will walk the streets of the city, you will notice other works by Černý: Hanging Out on Husova street, the Brownnosers at the Futura Gallery, and a bizarre “In Utero” sculpture on Dlouhá Street where visitors can step inside to “experience” the womb.

You should not miss Černý’s own center for art, the Meet Factory, which has interesting culture and entertainment programs, art exhibitions, theater and summer cinema, and an artist-in-residence program for visual artists, curators, musicians, theatre directors or writers.